The Election of 1800 : HamilTALONS Document of Learning

A. Character Development

Context

The song “The Election of 1800” is the 42nd song of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s award-winning musical Hamilton, between “It’s Quiet Uptown” and “Your Obedient Servant”. It follows the dramatic events leading up to and during the United States’ seventh presidential election. It focuses primarily on the campaigns of Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr, the two candidates most likely to win, as John Adams isn’t well liked during this time. The public continuously pressured Alexander Hamilton into sharing his opinion, however Hamilton is still grieving the loss of his son and wants to stay out of the eyes of the public.

The long, grueling process of campaigning has taken a toll on the candidates, especially on Burr who has taken a more involved approach to his campaign. When all the votes have been submitted, Jefferson and Burr emerge tied. When the outcome of the election is ultimately placed in Hamilton’s hands, he must make the decision to speak up. Due to him not having a particular fondness for either candidate, Hamilton has to make the difficult decision to promote Jefferson, as he believes Burr only cares about himself.

This endorsement puts the final nail in the coffin of Hamiton and Burr’s already shaky relationship, and the effects are clearly displayed in the next song, “Your Obedient Servant”.

Jefferson is surprised by Hamilton’s decision to promote him, but utterly relieved. That is until Burr approaches him. Burr congratulates Jefferson on his win and states he is looking forward to working with him as his vice president, as up until this point, the runner-up would assume that position. Jefferson, not thrilled to be working with his previous competition, and essentially tells Burr to get lost. Jefferson further rubs his victory in by saying he can change the rules; he is the president after all.

Characters

  • Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson wants to become president after being the vice-president for the past four years. After receiving advice from James Madison, Jefferson realises he would greatly benefit from the support of Hamilton. However, he is afraid his argumentative past with him has ruined his chances at this.

  • Aaron Burr

Aaron Burr is driven by his drive to become the president. It seems as though the ideals behind his political campaign are in stark contrast with the “talk less, smile more” and “lying in wait” attitude he has taken throughout the previous course of the narrative. He has learned that his previous philosophy hasn’t worked out for him, and takes a more Hamiton-esque approach to his campaign.

  • Alexander Hamilton

During most of “The Election of 1800”, Hamilton is still struggling to cope with his son Philp’s death. He wants to be left alone by the press, who keep pressuring him to pick a side. When he finally does, he must make the decision between two of his political rivals, and ultimately chooses Jefferson. It is clear his is fearful in having a leader who has ‘no beliefs’ and is so secretive of his motives and opinions.  

B. Connections to Historical Elements

Historical Events and Ideas

  • The Election of 1800

The election that took place in 1800 was just as wild, if not more, as is described in the song. In fact, many of the issues that arose during this election caused the rules surrounding presidential elections to be revised for the following election in 1804 with the 12th Amendment (see below). When Jefferson and Burr both received 73 votes each (John Adams receiving 65, Thomas Pinckney receiving 64, and Jon Jay [who was not actually running] receiving 1), the House of Representatives were to make the tie breaking decision. They were unable to reach a consensus for a long time. Eventually, things began to look like Burr would be the winner, however Hailton’s endorsement came right before the vote and helped secure Jefferson’s spot as president.   

  • The 12th Amendment

Up until the Election of 1800, each of 138 members of the Electoral College would cast two votes. The candidate who received the most votes would become the president, and the runner-up would become the vice president. However, the voters could not specify which candidate they wanted for vice president, and which they wanted for vice president. This quickly became an issue as more political views began to surface, resulting in politicians who were just campaigning against each other now having to work alongside one another to run a country. The 12th Amendment allowed there to be separate elections for president and vice president which helped to decrease the previous issue.

  • The Burr-Hamilton Duel

I will not be going into too much detail with this as it isn’t explicitly mentioned in “The Election of 1800”, but it is important to touch on this subject. Hamitlon’s decision to endorse Jefferson, “a man he’s despised since the beginning” (Burr in “Your Obedient Servant”) is seen as an act of betrayal by Burr. This moment is what pushed Burr over the edge and pathed the way for their duel to come.

Socials Curriculum (Big Idea)

  • Disparities in power alter the balance between individuals and between societies.

It can be seen through “The Election of 1800” that preexisting influence can have a big impact on current situations. Hamilton was well respected before the Reynolds Pamphlet was published, and his influence carried even through the scandal. His position of leadership was essentially the deciding factor of the election’s outcome.

We can also see disparities in power through the way votes were submitted. There were only 138 members of the Electoral College; only 138 decisions for a whole population. It is impossible to deny that the outcome could have been much different if only every American citizen had the ability to vote. This is still an issue that is being dealt with today, for example when it comes to felons and ex-felons in the United States; who should be allowed to vote and make decisions for us?

C. Thematic and Personal Connections

[Ensamble]

I like that Aaron Burr!

I can’t believe we’re here with him!

He seems approachable?

Like you could grab a beer with him!

The American Revolution was in many ways about getting away from the monarchy and having a say in the leaders of the country. The people could now choose who they wanted as president, and had the power to take their power away if they began to abuse it.

Now that there were elections, there had to be campaigning. Aaron Burr is often referred to as the ‘father of political campaigning’. Not only was he running as candidate that people could choose to vote for, he was making an effort to get to go out and mingle with regular people and to hear their concerns.

America was making a shift from absolute monarchy, to regular people getting a chance to lead, and an opinion on who should or shouldn’t be running the country.

 

[James Madison]

Hamilton’s on your side!

 

Without a king, people had the freedom to express their own political views. Though this was a good thing, it also caused more conflict between multiple parties within the same country. The fighting between these different groups was something new the young nation never had to deal with while under King George’s rule.

However, these different parties had to learn to put their differences aside when necessary, for example Hamilton, a Federalist, having to choose between two Democratic Republicans.

The American Revolution gave people more freedom, but also put more responsibility on their shoulders to make sacrifices and do what was right for the group as a whole.

 

[Aaron Burr]

It’s 1800; Ladies,

Tell your husbands, vote for Burr!

The American Revolution allowed for the disenfranchised to stand up for their rights. One of the most notable was that women were starting to fight for their equal treatment. Though this line may not seem like the most feminist thing to say, but it was definatly an improvement for the time. Since women weren’t allowed to vote in America until 1920, Burr suggesting they give their political opinions to their husbands was unheard of.

The American Revolution was not only an oppressed group of people fighting against their oppressors, it was the minorities of that oppressed group finding their voices too.

 

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TALONTalk: Climate Change, NPK Ratios, and Plants

To view my TALONTalk, click here. All you have to do is click the F5 key on your keyboard or “Play from Beginning”. It will continue automatically.

To view my script, click here.

To view my outline and my sources, click here.

Independent Investigation: Canada 1605-1763

To what extent did the Fur Trade effect the Canadian ecosystem?

Image result for beaver clipart

 

Historical Significance :

Canada’s history can beautiful and complex, however many events tend to be looked over or brushed off as insignificant. Take the Canadian Fur Trade; this unique trading opportunity provided a young nation with economic support and paved the way for the Canada we know today. While many praise the Fur Trade as a pivotal time in our history, it is important we can analyze and critique it from multiple points of view.

Yes, the Canadian Fur Trade helped build the Canadian economy, established relationships with the Indigenous peoples, and provided and incentive to explore the rest of Canada, many forget the negative effects this industry caused.

 

Image result for 1600s beaver hats

Cause and Consequence :

Undoubtably, the most evident effect the fur trade was the rapid decrease in the population of many animals native to Canada and essential to our delicate ecosystem; most importantly, the beaver. Its thick, luscious pelts were highly sought after in Europe in the form of hats and other garments. Beaver fur was all the rage in Europe during that time, and the Canadian fur traders decided to take full advantage of that. Hundreds of thousands of beavers were trapped and killed for their desirable pelts, resulting in massive population decreases. The once prosperous population of these animals began to drop at an alarming rate. This trend would continue well into the 19th century where the beaver became endangered and faced the risk of extinction. As the popularity of beaver fur decreased, so did the amount of beavers being killed. Slowly, the beaver population began to grow, and we no longer have to worry about our beavers going extinct anytime soon.

Not only did the new Europeans effect the wildlife, they effected the Indigenous peoples who have lived here for centuries before them. Some were good, such as forming alliances and evolving in trade, but others were very negative. By introducing guns, some Indigenous groups gained the upper hand when it came to conflict between different groups. The Europeans brought over many foreign diseases that the Indigenous people had never been exposed to, resulting in an epidemic of smallpox, measles, and more throughout Indigenous communities.

 

Image result for canadian  trade

Continuity and Change :

There are many similarities that can be found between the 17th and 18th centuries and our current day and age. The most notable, in this context at least, would be the fact our economy is heavily reliant on international trade, specifically of our natural resources. Early French settlers had strong trading relationships with their Indigenous neighbours and also European countries. Today, our trade has shifted from delectable furs to other natural resources and energy sources.

Though our predominant trading goods have changed throughout the years, the idea has stayed the same. We can share our natural resources that we have an abundance of, but that others don’t have access to.

Social Studies Inquiry Process :

In conclusion, the Canadian Fur Trade truly helped build our nation, but not without detrimental effects on our ecosystem. So many people and animals died for things they had no control over; that is a heavy burden we have to accept when analyzing our past. It is important we learn from our past, and make sure sustainability comes before profit so that we never have to face the risk of throwing our delicate ecosystem out of balance.

Sources :

Foster J. E., Eccles W. J. (September 19, 2016). The Canadian Encyclopedia: The Fur Trade. Retrieved from https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/fur-trade.

The Association for the Protection of Fur-Bearing Animals. (n.d.). Beavers and the Fur Trade. Retrieved from https://thefurbearers.com/what-we-do/living-with-wildlife/beavers/beavers-and-the-fur-trade.

Herscovichi A. (June 29, 2017). The Country that Fur Built: Canada’s Fur Trade History. Retrieved from https://www.truthaboutfur.com/blog/canada-fur-trade-history/.

Brown J. S. H. (August 19, 2015). The Canadian Encyclopedia: Beaver Pelts. Retrieved from https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/beaver-pelts.

 

Ecological Footprint Reflection

The Plan

> After completing the ecological footprint chart, I calculated that my footprint is 9.012 hectares.

> Unfortunately, my ecological footprint is higher than many other students in the class. While most of theirs are between 6-8 hectares, mine was 9. I am disappointed that my ecological footprint is on the higher side, but I am excited to try and live more sustainably!

> The ten actions that increase my ecological footprint the most are…

  1. Taking showers that last too long, especially when I wash my hair.
  2. I have many extra-curriculars that are too far to walk/ride a bike to, especially with the equipment I need to bring. It would be very difficult to walk 10km with my fencing bag!
  3. I don’t know all that many local bus routes.
  4. I am a meat-eater.
  5. I do not have very many second-hand clothes.
  6. Sometimes, I don’t think about what I throw in the laundry hamper. I assume not everything that ends up in there actually needs to be washed.
  7. We buy some pre-packaged food.
  8. I do not grow my own food.
  9. I enjoy going on the occasional shopping trip!
  10. My family is pretty small, only my parents, my dog, and myself, however we have a pretty large house (I doubt I will be able to change while trying to decrease my ecological footprint over the next moth though!)

> To decrease my ecological footprint, I will try to…

  1. Take quicker showers.

> Not only is this important to save water, it will free up some of my time! Since I really enjoy listening to music while I shower, I can put around five to ten minutes worth of music on and make sure I am done showering by the time the songs end.

  1. Learn new bus routes and take public transit more often.

> I actually really enjoy taking public transit, but never really took the time to learn local routes. The pollution created by cars is a big problem. By taking the bus, even just a few times a week, I know that I am helping to decrease the amount of pollution. Even if it is not a big change, everything helps. To find my way around, I used Google Maps, and asked for help from my parents and friends who take similar bus routes.

  1. Find carpools for when I cannot transit.

> As I mentioned earlier, the pollutions cars create is a large issue, and carpooling can help cut down on that. I am lucky; my mom works at Eagle Ridge Hospital which is very close to Gleneagle. This means that we both get to were we need to be in one car ride! She drops me off at school before continuing on to work. I have also started to carpool with school friends who live close to me, as well as begun carpooling with kids on my swim team.

  1. Decrease the amount of meat I eat.

> I have always been interested in going vegetarian, but I have never really been able to. Though I still eat meat, I am trying more vegetarian and vegan recipes out with my family. This is important as the livestock industry creates a lot of greenhouse gas pollution.

  1. Be mindful of what I throw in the laundry and re-wear more articles of clothing.

> By decreasing the amount of times clothing is washed, you save water and prolong the life of the clothing. Before throwing anything in the laundry, I will make sure that it actually needs to be washed. Anything that is still wearable can be set aside to wear again.

 

The Reflection

> I found it quite easy to cut down on my shower time and the amount of clothing I put in the wash. They did not require much change in my day-to-day life and only required for me to be more conscious. Carpooling and taking public transit was also pretty easy as it was enjoyable once I got used to it.

> The most difficult thing for me to change was trying to eat less meat. Since I do not always cook meals, it was tricky to get my parents on board. It was also difficult when going to my grandparent’s house for dinner, since their meals consist primarily of meat and potatoes.

> Some of the obstacles I encountered were trying to find vegetarian recipes, trying to learn bus routes without getting lost, and trying to find people to carpool with.

> In the future, I will try and keep up with the habits I worked on this past month. I also want to try and buy in bulk and shop second hand whenever I can.

In-Depth Blog Post #6

I can’t believe that In-Depth 2019 is coming to an end! This has been such an amazing experience; I have learned so much and really grown as a runner and athlete. I know so much more about training, injury prevention, shoe fitting, and more, and am excited to get to share my knowledge.

9 – Some of the recent areas covered in my mentor meetings have been continuing to increase the distance, working on good pacing, having a positive attitude, and preparing for the actual races.

10 – The most notable time offered alternates by my mentor was when I was getting fit for my new pair of shoes. She brought out multiple pairs and had me try each on and test them by walking around the store. After each pair I tried, we would discuss how they felt. If they were not feeling right for me, she would suggest an alternate pair I could test out. This continued until I finally found a pair that fit me perfectly.

For my learning centre, I plan on having a poster board containing a title, some facts, and a timeline of my training. I will also have my numbers from Up the Creek and the Vancouver Sun Run, along with photos of me. I will have some sort of sheet, possibly something resembling an infographic, talking about finding the right shoe and about the different training zones.

Animal Farm Final Guided Inquiry

There are three conditions essential for any revolution to occur: A need for change, a plan for change, and strong leadership. In George Orwell’s Animal Farm, each of these aspects is crucial to their revolution, and it is clear the revolution would not have happened without them.

As with every revolution, there must be a spark, a catalyst for new beginnings. If there wasn’t a need for change, why would a revolution even be needed? In Animal Farm, there is a definite need for change.  The animals are being abused by their owner, Mr. Jones, and their lives “are miserable, laborious, and short” (4). Most of the animals have either accepted that that is just the way things are, and the others who are tired of this inequality are convinced things can never change. Major, the farm’s beloved pig, decides it is time to rise up against their oppressors and put the humans in their place. He gives the farm animals an idea of what life can be like without Mr. Jones, showing them what they must fight for.

The next thing every revolution must have is a plan of action to reach the goal. This can be anything from advancements in technology to pinning 95 theses on the door of a church. In the case of Animal Farm, the animals plan to rebel and take control of the farm. Before the animals came up with this plan, any hope of revolutions was nothing more than a dream. What good is a dream if action is never taken to achieve it? It is the plan set in place that will set the revolution in motion.

The final piece essential in any revolution is having a strong leader focused on the cause. Without a clear leader, whether a single person or a group, there would be no one to share the need for change or the plan of action. Throughout Animal Farm, the leaders of Animalism change. The founder of this revolution is Major, a pig already “highly regarded on the farm” (3). Major’s previous influence on the farm allows for his ideas to spread more easily, and since he is already adored by the other animals, they trust him and these ideas. He is so influential, his speech has even given the “animals on the farm a completely new outlook on life” (7). Throughout the story, different animals take the position of the leader. Though they all share the same core ideals, they may begin to deviate from the original concept, or even begin to use it for personal gain. It is critical the leader in power stays true to the message of the revolution, or else it may turn into something it was never intended to be.

In conclusion, there are many different working parts in a revolution, but they can be simplified down to having an influential leader who has a goal, idea, and a plan. Each aspect is equally important as you cannot have one without the other. Without these parts, revolutions could never have occurred, and the world would never get to see change.

 

Power is a curious thing. It is built up slowly, behind the scenes until it emerges as something grand. Power cannot be achieved by just one person alone, it needs to be fed by supporters.

That is why leaders with power play a dangerous game. Though a person can have one belief, that view can transform as they gain more power or recognition. The devoted followers of these leaders can become so transfixed with following a certain person, they can become blind to these changes that are happening. For example, Napoleon the pig starts of like all the other Animalists on the farm, but as he gains more power, he starts to lose sight of his original values. Since he is such an influential ruler, his followers don’t feel like they need, or have the authority, to question claims. For example no one thinks to question things since “Napoleon is always right,” even though the law suddenly becomes that “all animals are equal, but some are more equal than others” instead of simply ‘all animals are equal’ (44).

We get a prime example of how scary power can become once a leader’s judgement becomes clouded. Near the end of the story, Napoleon becomes ruthless and violent, breaking the very laws of the foundation of Animalism. However, he believes since he is in charge, he can get a free pass. We get to see this from the other animal’s point of view when the leaders of Animal Farm are fighting with the humans, and how it has become “impossible to say which [is] which” (17, 44). The rulers of Animalsim have become the very forces they tried to overthrow all that time ago.

Overall, power will inevitably effect all, as it clouds the judgment of not only the ruler, but of the follower’s judgement of said ruler.

 

In my opinion, the animal’s revolution is not successful. Though they have rid Animal farm of all human authority, the animal government that replaces them is not any better. In the beginning, the animals were thriving in their new, human-free environment. But over time, they began to adopt some of the very human-like tenancies, even though they had promised that they “must not come to resemble him [human kind]” (3). Throughout the story, the rulers of Animal Farm become more and more hypocritical and corrupted, using their power to manipulate the other animals. The pigs have “taught themselves to read and write”, a book made by humans for humans (8). And since pigs are the only ones who know how to read and write, they use their knowledge to change the seven commandments for their own personal gain. Slowly, the fact that “all animals are equal” loses its value and becomes a lie the devoted animals still tell themselves (8).

In the end, the animals may have gotten rid of the humans, but the rulers that replaced them turned out to be just as bad, if not worse.

Animal Farm Guided Inquiry 22-44

Power is a curious thing. It is built up slowly, behind the scenes until it emerges as something grand. Power cannot be achieved by just one person alone, it needs to be fed by supporters.

That is why leaders with power play a dangerous game. Though a person can have one belief, that view can transform as they gain more power or recognition. The devoted followers of these leaders can become so transfixed with following a certain person, they can become blind to these changes that are happening. For example, Napoleon the pig starts of like all the other Animalists on the farm. But as he gains more power, he starts to lose sight of his original values. Since he is such an influential ruler, his followers don’t feel like they need, or have the authority, to question claims. For example no one thinks to question things when the law suddenly becomes that “all animals are equal, but some are more equal than others” (44).

We also get a prime example of how scary power can become once a leader’s judgement becomes clouded. Near the end of the story, Napoleon becomes ruthless and violent, breaking the very laws of the foundation of Animalism. However, he believes since he is in charge, he can get a free pass. We get to see this from the other animal’s point of view when the leaders of Animal Farm are fighting with the humans, and how it has become “impossible to say which [is] which” (44).

Overall, power will inevitably effect all, as it clouds the judgment of not only the ruler, but of the follower’s judgement of said ruler.

17th Century Letter

Dear Farming Neighbour,

How are you this fine day? I hope everything is going well with you and your family. Ever since we’ve no longer owed anything to the Lord, we have been making quite the profit! Good riddance! I assume you are having similar luck with your new-found freedom!

Anyways, I am writing to you to ask for a great favour. Would you be able to provide any extra hay or feed for my animals? Normally I would be able to myself but unfortunately, I have found myself quite busy dealing with the accusations against my cousin. She has been accused of being a witch! How ludicrous! We are quite distraught. As you can imagine, I have been very worried and have been a bit too preoccupied to properly care for the animals. I know it is a lot to ask, but it would mean a lot to me. Besides, you owe me for the cheese I gave you last winter!

Sincerely,

Mr. Farmer

Animal Farm Guided Inquiry 1-21

There are three conditions essential for any revolution to occur: A need for change, a plan for change, and strong leadership. In George Orwell’s Animal Farm, each of these aspects is crucial to their revolution, and it is clear the revolution would not have happened without them.

As with every revolution, there needs to be a spark; a catalyst for new beginnings. If there wasn’t a need for change, why would a revolution be needed at all? In Animal Farm, there is a strong need for change.  The animals on the farm are treated horribly by their owner, Mr. Jones. The animal’s lives on the farm “are miserable, laborious, and short” (4). Most of the animals have either accepted that that is just the way things are, but others are tired of this inequality but are convinced things can never change. But then Major, the farm’s beloved pig, decides it is time to rise up against their oppressors and put the humans in their place. He gives the farm animals an idea of what life can be like without Mr. Jones, showing them what they must fight for.

The next thing every revolution must have is a plan of action to reach their goal. This can be anything from improving technology to pinning 92 theses on the door of a church. In the case of Animal Farm, the animals plan to rebel and take control of the farm. Before the animals came up with this plan, any hope of revolutions was nothing more than a dream. What good is a dream if action is never taken to achieve it? It is the plan set in place that will set the revolution in motion.

The final piece essential in any revolution is having a strong leader focused on the cause. Without a clear leader, whether a single person or a group, there would be no one to share the need for change or the plan of action. Throughout Animal Farm, the leaders of Animalism change. The founder of this revolution is Major, a pig already “highly regarded on the farm” (3). Major’s previous influence on the farm allows for his ideas to spread more easily and since he is already adored by the other animals, they trust him and these ideas. He is so influential, his speech has even given the “animals on the farm a completely new outlook on life” (7). Throughout the story, different animals take the position of the leader. Though they all share the same core ideals, they may begin to deviate from the original concept, or even begin to use it for personal gain. It is critical the leader in power stays true to the message of the revolution, or else it may turn into something it was never intended to be.

In conclusion, there are many different working parts in a revolution, but they can be simplified down to having an influential leader who has a goal and a plan. Each aspect is equally important as you cannot have one without the other. Without these parts, revolutions could never have occurred, and the world would never get to see change.

 

 

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